Key Findings

Active and Collaborative Learning


Students learn more when they are actively involved in their education and have opportunities to think about and apply what they are learning in different settings. Through collaborating with others to solve problems or master challenging content, students develop valuable skills that prepare them to deal with the kinds of situations and problems they will encounter in the workplace, the community, and their personal lives. The following seven survey items contribute to this benchmark.

During the current school year, how often have you:

  • Asked questions in class or contributed to class discussions (4a)
  • Made a class presentation (4b)
  • Worked with other students on projects during class (4f)
  • Worked with classmates outside of class to prepare class assignments (4g)
  • Tutored or taught other students (paid or voluntary) (4h)
  • Participated in a community-based project as a part of a regular course (4i)
  • Discussed ideas from your readings or classes with others outside of class (students, family members, co-workers, etc.) (4r)

 

Key Findings: Active and Collaborative Learning

While the majority of students report that they often contribute to class discussions and work with other students in class, much smaller numbers report making class presentations and working with other students outside of class or in their communities.  

  • Nearly two-thirds (66%) of students often or very often ask questions or contribute to class discussions.
  • Over two-thirds (73%) have made a class presentation.  
  • Most have worked with other students on projects during class with 49% reporting they have done so very often or often and 40% reporting they have done so at least sometimes.
  • Almost one quarter (24%) of respondents have very often or often worked with classmates outside of class to prepare class assignments.
  • Nearly three-quarters (73%) have never tutored or taught other students.
  • Over three-quarters (77%) have never participated in a community-based project as part of a regular course.
  • Half (50%) have discussed ideas from their readings or classes with others outside of class often or very often and more than one-third (38%) have done so at least sometimes.

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